midway nissan

2018 Nissan Armada SL SUV

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Drive this home today! Check out this great value!
Both practical and stylish! Top features include rain sensing wipers, blind spot sensor, a trailer hitch, and power seats. A 5.6 liter V-8 engine pairs with a sophisticated 7 speed automatic transmission, and load leveling rear suspension maintains a comfortable ride. Well tuned suspension and stability control deliver a spirited, yet composed, ride and drive
We pride ourselves in consistently exceeding our customer’s expectations. Stop by our dealership or give us a call for more information.

Highlighted Features:

  • Navigation system


  • Blind spot sensor


  • Distance pacing cruise control


  • Leather upholstery


  • Automatic temperature control


  • Emergency communication system


  • Power moonroof


  • Wireless phone connectivity

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DON’T LET THE CHECK ENGINE LIGHT TURN YOU OFF FROM MAKING NEEDED REPAIRS

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The top 10 check engine light repairs from the annual CarMD® Vehicle Health Index™ reinforces what the Car Care Council has been saying for years. Motorists who ignore the check engine light get less miles per gallon and could face costly repairs down the road.

“Many people fear that when the check engine light comes on, it is going to mean several hundred or more dollars in repairs, so they ignore the light and hope the problem goes away,” said Rich White, executive director, Car Care Council. “Data from CarMD makes it clear that not addressing the cause of an illuminated check engine light can cost you in terms of wasted fuel and more expensive repairs in the future.”

When the check engine light is illuminated, it usually means that the vehicle system, such as the ignition, fuel injection or emission control, is not operating properly, even if the vehicle appears to be running normally. The top 10 most common check engine light repairs as reported by the recently released CarMD Vehicle Health Index are as follows.

  1. Replace O2 sensor(s)
  2. Replace ignition coil(s) and spark plug(s)
  3. Replace catalytic converter
  4. Inspect fuel cap and tighten or replace as necessary
  5. Replace evaporative emissions (EVAP) purge control valve
  6. Replace mass airflow (MAF) sensor
  7. Replace ignition coil(s)
  8. Replace evaporative emissions (EVAP) purge solenoid
  9. Replace fuel injector(s)
  10. Replace thermostat

“Following a recommended maintenance schedule and addressing small problems before they become bigger ones will help extend the life of your car and minimize check engine related repairs,” continued White. “It’s important to note that most of the common check engine problems negatively impact a car’s fuel economy and become more costly to repair if service is delayed.”

The Car Care Council’s popular Car Care Guide features helpful information about the check engine light. Available in English and Spanish, a printed copy of the 80-page Car Care Guide can be ordered free-of-charge by visiting www.carcare.org/car-care-guide.

The Car Care Council is the source of information for the “Be Car Care Aware” consumer education campaign promoting the benefits of regular vehicle care, maintenance and repair to consumers. For the latest car care news, visit the council’s online media room at http://media.carcare.org.

10 Most Important Spring Car Cleaning Tips

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Spring Cleaning isn’t limited to just your house! Your car deserves some love too. Check out these spring car cleaning tips.

As the sun warms up, you may feel the need to roll up your sleeves and to tackle the big task of cleaning and tuning up your car. Getting rid of the winter mess inside and on the outside of your car is critical. The following are the 10 most important things you should do:

  1. Carpeting and Upholstery: Focus first on the interior carpeting and upholstery. Using a damp towel, wash down the seats. Get rid of any rock salt debris, mud or dry dirt on the carpeting using a carpet-cleaning machine, if possible.
  2. The Console: Wash the consoles carefully. Avoid getting electrical connections wet, but do wipe them down appropriately. Clean out cup holders, too. Use a wet cloth to get the top of the dashboard, but be careful to dry it thoroughly
  3. Organize: Clean out the compartments. In your rush to get inside and out of the cold during the winter, you may have debris, trash or just too much stuff in the car. Get the compartments cleaned out and organized.
  4. The Windows: Shine the windows. After all that winter driving, the windows will need a bit of extra attention. Clean the inside and outside using a window cleaner. Shine them with a dry towel. Do the mirrors of the vehicle in the same way.
  5. The Trunk: Check the trunk of the vehicle next. Clean out the wintertime mess. This is also a good time to make sure the spare tire is in good repair. Be sure your emergency kit is in order too. Vacuum the trunk out.
  6. The Exterior Body: Look at the exterior of the car. A good car washing is often in order. Make sure the first spring car wash is a thorough one that gets the winter grime out of cracks and under the edges. Use a soft towel and a mild detergent to wash the vehicle down.
  7. The Wheels: Pay some extra attention to the wheels. Remove the hubcaps and wash them down. Scrub the tires and wheel wells thoroughly. This is also a good time to check the tire pressure and to tighten up any loose lug nuts.
  8. Under the Hood: Look under the hood next. Leaves, debris and even dirt can get into the engine area. In some cases, just wiping down the edges is enough. In other cases, you may need to consider having the engine wiped off or professionally cleaned.
  9. Waxing: Waxing the exterior of the car is a good idea, as long as you do so out of direct sunlight. Choose a spray or liquid wax for the best results. If you are using a new product, test it on a hidden portion of the car’s body to ensure it works properly.
  10. Replace Wipers: After a harsh winter, many vehicles require new windshield wipers. Having wipers in good working order is necessary, especially during intense spring showers.

Take an afternoon to detail clean the car. Doing so will make sure the vehicle is in the best condition possible for the upcoming summer months.

Police Stops: What to Do If You Are Pulled Over

When You See the Police Car Police Stop

If a police car is following you with its siren blaring or emergency lights flashing, pull over to the right quickly (but safely) and come to a complete stop in a safe place.

Pulling over right away isn’t an admission of guilt. It just means that you were alert to everything that was happening around you. Also, by stopping as soon as you can, you’ll have a better chance of figuring out exactly where and how the officer says you violated any traffic laws. This information can be useful should you and a lawyer later need to prepare a defense.

Pull over in a way that will be most likely to calm down an angry or annoyed traffic officer. Use your turn signal to indicate any lane changes from left to right, and slow down fairly quickly, but not so quickly that the officer will have to brake to avoid hitting you. Pull over as far to the right as possible, so that the officer won’t have to worry about being clipped by vehicles in the right lane when coming up to your window.

Right After You Stop

After you’ve pulled over to a safe spot, you should normally turn off your engine. At this point, you might want to show the officer a few other token courtesies. You have little to lose and perhaps something to gain.

Roll down your window all the way. Put out a cigarette if you have one and discard any chewing gum (within the car). You might also want to place your hands on the steering wheel, and, if it’s dark, turn on your interior light. These actions will tend to allay any fears the officer might have. After all, police officers have been killed in traffic-stop situations, and the officer’s approach to the vehicle is potentially the most dangerous moment.

Your dignity might be offended a little at this point, but remember that you’re just doing a few simple things to put the officer in an optimal frame of mind.

Also, stay in the car until and unless the officer directs you to get out. Finally, don’t start rummaging through your back pocket for your wallet and license, or in your glove compartment for your registration, until the officer asks you for them. For all the officer  knows, you could be reaching for a weapon.

Excuses to Search

A police officer who stops you for a traffic violation is normally not allowed to search your vehicle. But there are several exceptions to this general rule.

After pulling you over, an officer will watch for any sort of “furtive movement.” A sudden lowering of one or both shoulders, for example, will tip the officer off that you’re attempting to hide something under the seat.

An officer enforcing a traffic stop isn’t looking just for furtive movements. Officers will look for anything incriminating that’s in “plain view” (like open beer or wine bottles, joints, or roach clips). Discovery of one item in plain view often leads to a thorough search that reveals more incriminating or illegal objects.

If you’re arrested and your car is towed, the police may generally make an “inventory search” afterward, even if they have no reason to suspect there’s anything illegal inside